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June 2018 Bird Walks
Category: Bird Watching
Find similar posts in: Bird Watching
  • Chestnut-backed Chickadee

    Chestnut-backed Chickadee
    Peter Coxon Photo
  • Wood Duck

    Wood Duck
    Peter Coxon Photo
  • Willow Flycatcher

    Willow Flycatcher
    Ralph Hocken Photo
  • Common Loon

    Common Loon
    Ralph Hocken Photo
  • Swainson's Thrush

    Swainson's Thrush
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  • Red-breasted Sapsucker

    Red-breasted Sapsucker
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June 5, 2018 - Rathtrevor Beach Provincial Park

The Tuesday bird walk went to Rathtrevor Beach Provincial Park in Parksville. The morning was cloudy with winds off the Strait of Georgia.

Ten Great Blue Herons were seen just off shore. During the walk, four Pigeon Guillemots and six White-winged Scoters were seen further off shore. A Western Wood- Pewee was seen at the edge of the forest. A lone Caspian Tern was spotted heading up the Strait giving us great views. We watched a Brown Creeper with a Dragonfly in its bill go into a nest hole on a tree next to the trail.

Twenty-two birders, including two visiting birders from the United Kingdom saw and heard forty species.

June 12, 2018 - Beaver Ponds in Nanoose Bay

The Tuesday bird walk went to the Beaver Ponds in Nanoose Bay. The morning was cloudy with calm winds. The walk was 3.1 kilometers long and took two hours and twenty-three minutes.

A juvenile Black-headed Grosbeak flew just above us followed by a male Black-headed Grosbeak. We discovered a family of Chestnut-backed Chickadees on the ground under some bushes in the first little meadow. A Barred Owl was spotted perched on a snag. A Mallard Duck with two chicks and a Wood Duck with three chicks greeted us on the Beaver Ponds. A Willow Flycatcher was seen a the top of a snag next to the trail. A Purple Finch was spotted at the very top of a very tall tree.

Thirteen birders, including two visiting birders from Vancouver saw and heard thirty-two species.

June 19, 2018 - Englishman River Estuary

The Tuesday bird walk went the Plummer Road side of the Englishman River Estuary in Parksville. The morning was sunny with calm winds.

We heard and then saw a Willow Flycatcher perched at the top a tall bush. Bright yellow American Goldfinch dotted the bushes beside the river. Turkey Vultures and Bald Eagles were seen high over head during the walk. We spotted a Spotted Sandpiper perched on a rock near the river.

A very large flock of Canada Geese were resting along the shore of the river. A Common Loon, a Marbled Murrelet and two Pigeon Guillemots were seen heading up the Strait of Georgia. Swainson's Thrush, a Hammond's Flycatcher and a Pacific-slope Flycatcher were heard singing on the walk. A flock of Band-tailed Pigeons, several Eurasian-collared Doves and a flock of Rock Pigeons flew over.

A Mink entertained us as it ran along the shore line and swam just off shore, giving us great views!

Thirteen birders, saw and heard forty-four species.

June 26, 2018 - Lot Ten in Qualicum Beach

The Tuesday bird walk went to Lot Ten in Qualicum Beach. The morning was sunny with calm winds. A Swainson's Thrush, a Warbling Vireo and an Anna's Hummingbird greeted us at the start of the walk while they were feeding low in a bush close to the trail.

We heard a Red-eyed Vireo singing from high up in the very tall trees in the forest. There were two Red-breasted Sapsuckers high up in the tall trees. Purple Martins, Northern Rough-wing Swallows and Violet-green Swallows were seen hawking insects above the river. A Cooper's Hawk, a Sharp-shinned Hawk, a Bald Eagle and three Turkey Vultures were seen flying high overhead. A Western Tanager was spotted flying between the tall trees along the river.

Several American Robins were mobbing a Barred Owl at the end of the walk.

Sixteen birders, saw and heard thirty-six species.

You can find regularly posted bird walk updates like this one on The Backyard Wildbird & Nature Store blog.

To learn where the next Tuesday bird walk will be, check our calendar.

Click here for more information on bird watching in Parksville Qualicum Beach.
Posted By: Neil Robins on Aug 7, 2018
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